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General is highest ranking Army officer killed in Iraq or Afghanistan; DOD offers condolence

Update: Tuesday the Department of Defense issued this condolence statement:

Condolence Statement from the Army Chief of Staff General Ray Odierno for the Loss of Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene

"
Our thoughts and prayers are with Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene's family, and the families of our soldiers who were injured today in the tragic events that took place in Afghanistan. These soldiers were professionals, committed to the mission. It is their service and sacrifice that define us as an Army.

Our priority right now is to take care of the families, ensuring they have all the resources they need during this critical time.

We remain committed to our mission in Afghanistan and will continue to work with our Afghan partners to ensure the safety and security of all coalition soldiers and civilians."


Update:  Major General Harold Greene has been identified as the U.S. general killed in Afghanistan Tuesday.

A spokesperson at Army War College in Carlisle confirms the Major General studied there from 2002 to 2003.



WASHINGTON (AP) -- An American general has become the highest-ranking U.S. Army officer to be killed in the Iraq or Afghanistan wars.
  
A Pentagon spokesman says the general was killed in an apparent insider attack today by a member of the Afghan security forces. The shooting wounded another 15 people, about half of them Americans.

According to the spokesman, the assailant was dressed in an Afghan army uniform when he fired into a group of international soldiers at a defense university at a base west of Kabul. The shooter was then killed.

The attack occurred during a visit to the university by coalition members.

The number of so-called "insider attacks" -- incidents in which Afghan security turn on their NATO partners -- largely dropped last year. In 2013, there were 16 deaths in 10 separate attacks. In 2012, 53 coalition troops were killed in 38 separate attacks.
 
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