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Tips for staying safe in a blackout

Another winter storm is headed our way on Wednesday. With this storm, ice is expected. Ice storms can also mean widespread power outages. To keep your and your family safe in the event of a blackout, check out these tips.

Before a Blackout
  • Build an emergency kit.
  • Fill plastic containers with water and place them in the refrigerator and freezer. The chilled or frozen water will help to keep food cold during a temporary power outage. 
  • Keep your car tank at least half full. Gas stations rely on electricity to power their pumps.
  • Know where the manual release lever of your electric garage door opener is located and how to operate it. Garage doors can be heavy, so know that you may need help to lift it.
  • Keep a key to your house with you if you regularly use the garage as the primary means of entering your home, in case the garage door will not open.
 
During a Blackout
  • Use only flashlights for emergency lighting. NEVER use candles during a blackout or power outage due to extreme risk of fire.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed to keep your food as fresh as possible. If you must eat food that was refrigerated or frozen, check it carefully for signs of spoilage.
  • Turn off or disconnect appliances, equipment (like air conditioners) or electronics in use when the power went out. Power may return with momentary "surges or spikes that can damage computers as well as motors in appliances like the air conditioner, refrigerator, washer or furnace.
  • Do not run a generator inside a home or garage.
  • Do not connect a generator to a home's electrical system.  If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to run directly to the outlets on the generator.
  • Listen to local radio and to a battery- or generator-powered television for updated information.
  • Leave on one light so that you'll know when your power returns.
  • Do not call 9-1-1 for informationcall only to report a life-threatening emergency. Use the phone for life-threatening emergencies only.
  • Put on layers of warm clothing if it is cold outside. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your oven as a source of heat. If the power may be out for a prolonged period, plan to go to another location (the home of a relative or friend, or a public facility) that has heat to keep warm.
 
After a Blackout
  • Throw away any food that has been exposed to temperatures 40 F (4 C) for 2 hours or more or that has an unusual odor, color or texture. When in doubt, throw it out!
  • Never taste food or rely on appearance or odor to determine its safety. Some foods may look and smell fine, but if they have been at room temperature too long, bacteria causing food-borne illnesses can start growing quickly. Some types of bacteria produce toxins that cannot be destroyed by cooking.
  • If food in the freezer is colder than 40 F and has ice crystals on it, you can refreeze it.
For more information, visit ready.gov

For numbers to report power outages, CLICK HERE.
 
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