MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Gnoza Knows It | Can you get a DUI on a bike? On a lawnmower? On a jet ski?

WHPThumbnail

Today's Gnoza Knows It deals with two very popular topics: riding a bicycle when you're drunk and getting bitten by a rattlesnake.

Both are good things to generally avoid.

I got a question from a friend of mine named Pat, "Al, can you get arrested for getting loaded and then riding a bike, or even riding a lawnmower?"

The answer is yes.

I emailed criminal defense attorney Gary Lysagt, the guy with the cool billboards.

He says: Al, I have represented clients who have been charged with and convicted of DUI while on a bicycle, on a horse, in a buggy, a tractor, lawnmower, snowmobile, ATV, not to mention BUI for jetskis and boats.

Wow. Morale of the story is, drink at home alone. I guess.


Now to rattlesnakes.

This is their busy time of the year, but are they prevalent enough to be a worry? I asked a nature expert that I know how far south the rattlers come. He says he's seen them on the Stony Creek Trail and of course the Appalachian Trail.

The State Bureau of Forestry gives some tips on how to avoid getting bitten:

  • Walk at a normal pace so you will not surprise a snake.
  • Look for rattlesnakes before you sit down; reach into, over or under brush, logs or rocks.
  • Be aware that rattlesnakes are attracted to certain structures to hunt for mice or to bask. Be especially cautious near open, sunny rock-piles, logs or boards. Snakes may also be found around sheds or equipment.

They also caution not to pick up a rattlesnake. I know, but apparently some people try. They say most people who are bitten are handling one or tying to pick one up.

Rattlers are generally secretive and docile and may issue a warning buzz to avoid a confrontation. The Bureau of Forestry suggests maintaining a three foot distance between yourself and a rattlesnake.

How about 30 miles?

Trending